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Why Teenagers Struggle with Metaphors

So, I saw this poster on similes and metaphors:

It has four sections: definition, purpose, quick memory tip, and examples. But here are the three examples for metaphor:

According to the poster’s own definition, a metaphor is “a comparison between two things that are nor alike and replaces the word with another word.”

Some examples I used when teaching my students are Shakespeare’s “Juliet is the sun.” Looking for something more familiar? Try Katy Perry’s “baby, you’re a firework.” And sure, while “the toast jumped out of the toaster” is an implied metaphor comparing toast to something that jumps–a frog, or a person, it’s not a good example for learning metaphor. And as for the others, what two different things are possibly being compared in “I’m so hungry I could eat a horse” or “I told you a million times to clean your room”? Nothing. Because they’re not metaphors. They’re hyperbole, which is totally different.

Today’s lesson? Students struggle with metaphor because people who are supposed to be teaching it don’t even know what it is. Oh, and Your Dictionary is a terrible resource. Don’t use it.